MASS Gallery
507 Calles Street Suite 108
Austin, TX 78702

ERCATX is the annual survey / salon / showcase of Austin-based moving image artists compiled by Experimental Response Cinema.

Experimental Response Cinema is excited to present its third showcase/salon of Austin based moving image artists! Taking the form of a curated open-screening, this is an annual moment where we invite artists to show their recent projects. This years edition features work by Henna Chou & Wiley Wiggins, Bug Davidson, Raul De Lara, Jarrett Hayman, Sarah Hill, Barna Kantor, Tom Rosenberg, Scott Stark, Jeanne Stern, Rachel Stuckey, and Dan Stuyck.

Program

Envy by Dan Stuyck
5 min / digital / sound / 2014
12 images in 3700 fragments. A hymn to the most universal of human emotions, in all its stroboscopic glory. Music by The Able Sea.

Clypps by Scott Stark
11 min / digital / sound / 2014
A smattering of orphaned sequences, stitched together into a lopsided family video quilt.

Nevermore by Jeanne Stern
4 min / digital / sound / 2013
Nevermore is a collection of works centering around a toad and his watery domestic life. This series of dioramas and film depicts the collision of domestic space and nature, using a toad’s home as the starting point.

Rehearsal by Tom Rosenberg
11 min / digital / sound / 2014
A surreal study of a simulated terrorist attack in middle America. Composed frames observe the meticulous care taken to stage a hyperreal terrorist event. Once the bomb goes off, hundreds of volunteers deliver a convincing performance as stunned and mutilated blast victims.

Lithopedion by Henna Chou & Wiley Wiggins
10 min / digital / sound / 2014
Lithopedion is a rare phenomenon which occurs most commonly when a fetus dies during an abdominal pregnancy, is too large to be reabsorbed by the body, and calcifies on the outside, shielding the mother’s body from the dead tissue of the fetus and preventing infection.
This piece was created from the soundscape on the basis of an idea outlining the timeline of a sequence of events occuring over a period of 5 years, then divided into segments representing events over that time length having been proportionally divided to fit within “9 months” as represented within 10 minutes. The sound scape uses various field recordings gathered in Oakland and San Francisco, Los Angeles, Austin, TX as well as composition and arrangements created in a recording studio.

Soft, Dewy Morning (Reel/Life/Rushes: No.1) by Jarrett Hayman
6 min / Super 8mm / silent / 2014
The first in a series of short diary films made on Super-8mm, Soft, Dewy Morning was shot with the last few rolls of fresh Ektachrome that I was able to purchase just after this stock was discontinued. I couldn’t bear to physically cut the film, nor did I feel comfortable making a digital copy. Thus the film is presented as it came out of the camera, a series of sketches in magnificent color now lost to history.

Nothing Like Ivanhoe by Bug Davidson
9:28 min / digital / sound / 2013
Nothing Like Ivanhoe stabs at magical realism with a queer sound. Using genre tools and handmade props this short rejects the redundancy of story in our collective cinematic past to emphasize what many in the contemporary audience see as an exhausted narrative. A coming out story, a love story, a hero story; perhaps these things are Ivanhoe.

Water Monsters by Raul De Lara
1:06 min / digital / sound / 2014
This particular piece really highlights my love for stop motion and giving life to objects/found objects. I was interested in giving this space a new feeling. I also really enjoyed experimenting with my materials: piles of dead leafs.

it’s ok by Sarah Hill
9 min / digital / sound / 2013-2014
The documentation that I have received from performance festivals in the past leaves much to be desired. Usually the videos are compressed and typically poorly shot due to the nature of making live work. I understand that this hand held look, is the aesthetic of performance documentation. For these reasons among others is why I started animating my performance documentation. It’s Ok seeks to break down these historical rules of chop shop, do it yourself feel of “performance documentation.” The animation captures the movement of the camera, which provides a direct link back to the original documentation. The movement of the hand drawn line captures the initial catharsis of the live performance in a way that they video documentation could never achieve.
It’s OK, is an animation of I’m Fine performed at Le Lieu, centre en art actuel in Québec, Canada. The animation is a total of 12,168 hand drawn drawings totaling eight minutes and 45 seconds. The performative process of drawing each frame of I’m Fine allowed me to create a form of documentation that captured the energy of the initial live act.

D – A24Hz / Ferguson, MO 2014 by Barna Kantor
10 min / digital / sound / 2014
Digital video of analog, 24Hz light.

It Takes All Sorts by Rachel Stuckey
10 min / digital / sound / 2014
It Takes All Sorts examines the power structures of healthcare, cinema, and normalcy using the domain of the woods as a laboratory and native flora as characters. Elements from the soundtrack of a 1970s educational film about hospital labor provide a fertile bed for reinterpretation of the mechanization of care and desire to control nature.

Bios

Henna Shih-Han Chou is a reformed vagabond, lover of sounds, and canine enthusiast. Originating from Tucson, Arizona she has traveled the world over the past decade as a Geographic Information Systems Analyst and musician.

Bug Davidson is a motion image artist and film director. Their most recent film, Nothing Like Ivanhoe, premiered in a sponsored screening by Polari Festival’s filmmaker assistance program. Davidson received the Puffin Foundation Grant to continue ongoing lens based performance work, Rule of Three, and is proud to have been workshopping the project this spring in the inaugural year of the Critique Group program at The Austin Contemporary. Bug has studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, The School of Visual Arts NYC and The Irish Film Center Dublin.

Raul De Lara
I am studio Art major at UT. I consider myself a sculptor and material explorer. My work reveals itself through many different mediums and lenses. Sometimes I create a video using sculptures yet you never get to see the sculpture in person. Other times, there is no video; only the object. My work roots on living things and nature. I try and give my work a life in itself and a purpose.​

Jarrett Hayman is a film & video maker living in Austin, Texas. He has shown work at the Kinetic Gallery at SUNY Geneseo in upstate New York, and participated in screenings in the New Media Art and Sound Summit (NMASS) and Tiny Park Gallery, both in Austin. After dropping out of the English program at Southeastern Louisiana University, he worked an assortment of odd jobs, such as canning fish in Alaska, before settling for six years in Portland, Oregon. He obtained his BA in Film from Portland State University in 2011.

Sarah Hill recently moved to Austin, Texas. They had their first international solo show at Le Lieu, Center en art Acuel, Canada. They have performed at the following places, International Performance Platform Festival in Lublin, Poland at Gallery Labirynt. And at Performatorium 2014: Festival of Queer Performance Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Sarah received their MFA from the Museum School in partnership with Tufts University, Boston. They have studied with Black Market International at the Festival of live Art in Glasgow, Scotland. They have performed at Mobius, Proof Gallery and Anthony Greaney in Boston, Grace Exhibition Space in New York, and at little berlin in Philadelphia. They have screened videos in Melbourne Australia, Scotland, Canada, Miami and New York. Sarah has worked on projects with William Pope. L (Cusp) and Roderick Buchanan (Swim).

Barna Kantor is an interdisciplinary artist who makes digital and sculptural interpretations of internal, time-based processes, as well as manages public art projects that express their physical and data-based environments.

Tom Rosenberg is an award winning Texas based filmmaker. He has produced films on several continents, from rural Sri Lanka to the American Bible Belt. His films have screened internationally at the Viennale, CPH:DOX, HotDocs and other major film festivals. He is currently pursuing an MFA in film production at the University of Texas, Austin. He enjoys surfing and Houston rap.

Austinite Scott Stark has been experimental films and videos for way too long, yet he doesn’t seem to be able to stop. He is one of the founders of Experimental Response Cinema.

Jeanne Stern creates bizarre cinematic worlds using a hybrid of animation, puppetry, and dioramas. She earned her MFA in Film at the University of Texas in Austin (2007), and she recently completed an artist residency at the Atlantic Center for the Arts with filmmaker Charles Atlas. Her work has shown internationally in venues including SXSW, the Smithsonian, the Athens Video Art Festival, and Heather Henson’s touring film festival Handmade Puppet Dreams. She has also taught courses in experimental animation for UT Austin in Portugal, and at the Austin School of Film.

​Rachel Stuckey is a moving-image artist who works primarily with video and film to make exploratory, non-narrative works on topics involving the body, the occult, and nature. She received a BFA in Filmmaking from the University of Colorado and is currently pursuing her MFA in Studio Art with a focus in time-based media arts at the University of Texas. Rachel also programs for Experimental Response Cinema and The Mad Stork Cinema in Austin, Texas.

Daniel Stuyck is a filmmaker in Austin, TX, where he also runs his own color and title design firm. His critical writings on film have appeared in Film Comment, Cinema Scope and Vertigo, among others. A one-time film projectionist as well, he really digs this whole cinema thing.

Wiley Wiggins is an interactive designer and performer living in Austin, TX. wileywiggins.com

MASS is funded and supported in part by the City of Austin through the Economic Development Department/Cultural Arts Division believing an investment in the Arts is an investment in Austin’s future.